Lima, Peru Business Travel Resource Guide


So you’re going to Lima for work and you’re not sure what to expect? Here are some tips.

From most international destinations, you’ll be flying in to the Aeropuerto Internacional Jorge Chávez, 16km from the city. Be sure to get an official taxi from the airport. Most hotels offer taxi service, so it may be a good idea to book through them. Taxi Tips: Check the drivers ID (to make sure they work for the company they say they represent), don’t put your money in the trunk (the driver can drive away when you get out of the car to get your bag), sit in the front seat (it makes you look like less of a tourist) and DO NOT put your purse or bag in the seat next to your or your lap (someone may break out the window and take off with your bag). No kidding, the last one happened to me about a year ago.

Before you leave, check the health info at the CDC page and check with your travel doctor for any vaccinations that may be recommended and updated health information. Malaria medication isn’t needed in the city, but may be if you visit other parts of the country. The Yellow Fever vaccination isn’t required for travel between Peru and the US, but may be needed if you plan to visit other countries in South America.

The currency is the Nuevo Sol. You can check conversion rates here.

DOWNLOAD OUR TRAVEL GUIDES

FOR FREE

 

Gets some tips and stories from real travelers from BootsnAll. You can check the Lima Post for local news in English. Peruvians LOVE to talk politics, so you may want to brush up before you go. Fujimori is still a pretty hot topic.

Don’t want to offend anyone? Check out some tips for Latin American business etiquette.

The official language of Peru is Spanish. English is not widely spoken, so if you don’t habla español be sure to take a dictionary. South American countries are very formal in their speech. Use the ud. form and “buenos días” rather than “hola.”

If your company hasn’t made your hotel reservations, you can get them here.

For great airfare deals, you can check with BootsnAll.

For visa information, check with the appropriate embassy. You don’t need one to travel from the US, but of-course you need your passport.

DON’T DRINK THE WATER and DON’T SWIM IN THE OCEAN. Many local people don’t understand that the water will make foreign people sick because it doesn’t bother them. Upscale restaurants and hotels will have filtered ice machines. You may want to ask before you order a pisco sour on ice (which are FABULOUS). Also, be careful of fresh fruits and vegetables. Be sure they are washed in purified water.